Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Davy Jones, Singer, Musician, "The Monkees" 1945-2012

Davy Jones, lead singer for the famous Sixties TV band The Monkees, has died of a massive heart attack, early Wednesday afternoon.

His publicist, Helen Kensick, said the singer died in Indiantown, Fla., where he lived.

With an infectious smile and easy humor, the diminutive Brit played the Paul McCartney role in the Beatles-inspired quartet, which also included Peter Tork, Micky Dolenz and Mike Nesmith.

Jones sang lead on some of the group's biggest hits, including Daydream Believer.

Davy Jones continued to stay busy after The Monkees, doing music gigs and attending collectors' shows. Here he's at the Hollywood Collectors and Celebrities Show in 2009.

Jones, who like his bandmates had continued to perform, had dates scheduled for March.

Formed in 1966 by Hollywood producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider, The Monkees quickly stormed radio and TV airwaves with a string of chart-topping songs that went on to sell an estimated 65 million copies worldwide.

"There were certain indelible images we had of The Monkees, and that was Mike's cap, Micky's goofy looks and Davy's cuteness," says Phil Gallo, senior correspondent at Billboard. "Of all of them, Davy's character was the softest. He was the nice guy, the crowd pleaser."

Gallo recalls being a kid in the 1960s, "collecting Batman cards, then graduating to Monkees cards, way before I got into baseball cards. They were the very first boy band, when you think about it."

Jones was born Dec. 30, 1945, in Manchester, England. His long hair and British accent helped him achieve heartthrob status in the United States.

According to the Monkees website,, he left the band in late 1970. In the summer of 1971, he recorded a solo hit Rainy Jane and made a series of appearances on American variety and television shows, including Love, American Style and The Brady Bunch.

By the mid-1980s, Jones teamed up Tork, Dolenz and promoter David Fishof for a reunion tour. Their popularity prompted MTV to re-air The Monkees series, introducing the group to a new audience.

In 1989, the group received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In the late 1990s, the group filmed a special called Hey, Hey, It's The Monkees.

Jones is survived by his wife, Jessica, and four daughters from previous marriages.

Another of my childhood heroes is gone! May he rest in Peace.

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Lynn "Buck" Compton, Esq. 2nd LT. Easy Company, 506 PIR, 101st Airborne Div. 1921-2012

BURLINGTON, Wash. (AP) — Lynn D. "Buck" Compton, a veteran whose World War II exploits were depicted in the HBO miniseries "Band of Brothers," has died, his family said.
Compton died Saturday in Burlington, Wash., after having a heart attack last month, the family told the Los Angeles Times in a story Tuesday.
In January, nearly 200 guests, including actors from the miniseries, attended his 90th birthday party, the Skagit Valley Herald reported.
"To us he wasn't really a war hero, he was just a hero, period," Tracy Compton told the Herald.
Lynn Compton also is remembered for his legal career in California. He headed the team that prosecuted Sirhan B. Sirhan for the slaying of Robert F. Kennedy and was appointed to the 2nd District Court of Appeal in 1970 by Gov. Ronald Reagan. He retired from the bench in 1990.
He was awarded a Silver Star and a Purple Heart during World War II. But it wasn't until later in life that he became famous for his military service as a first lieutenant in Easy Company after the unit parachuted into France on D-Day in 1944. Historian Stephen E. Ambrose's 1992 best seller about the unit was made into the 2001 TV series.
"His career as a prosecutor and a judge overrode his military career until 'Band of Brothers' came out, and then it just went crazy," daughter Syndee Compton said.
A passage in the book recalled the D-Day invasion of France: "Compton had been an All-American catcher on the UCLA baseball team. The distance to the fleeing enemy was about the same as from home plate to second base. Compton threw his grenade on a straight line — no arch — and it hit a German in the head as it exploded."
Compton was embarrassed by the attention at his birthday party at Skagit Regional Airport that was attended by children of other Band of Brothers veterans.
"All I can say is it's flattering — and kind of embarrassing," Compton told the Herald. "We didn't expect anything more than those other guys (in the war). We're celebrating longevity more than anything."
The guests included "Band of Brothers" actors Michael Cudlitz, James Madio, Richard Speight Jr. and Neal McDonough, who portrayed Compton in the miniseries.
McDonough recalled meeting with Compton the day before he flew to London to begin filming "Band of Brothers," and later peppering him with questions about his time during the war.
"When you play a historical figure, you have to do it right and tell the truth," McDonough told the Times, recalling that Compton told him he was just doing his job.
"He'd say that's what soldiers do," said McDonough, who kept in touch with Compton and nicknamed his 6-year-old son Morgan "Little Buck" in his honor.
Tracy Compton said her father thought McDonough did a wonderful job portraying him and that "he laughed and said Neal was better-looking than he ever was."
Compton was born in Los Angeles on Dec. 31, 1921. He majored in physical education and minored in education at UCLA, where he lettered in football and baseball. He started at guard in the 1943 Rose Bowl game against Georgia and was selected all-conference catcher while captain of the baseball team in 1942.
He also participated in the ROTC program and entered active service in February 1943 at age 21.
After the war, he became a Los Angeles police officer and worked his way through Loyola Law School. He was a detective in the Central Burglary Division before joining the district attorney's office in 1951. He was assistant district attorney when District Attorney Evelle J. Younger chose him as his chief deputy in 1966.
Compton's memoir "Call of Duty: My Life Before, During and After the Band of Brothers," written with Marcus Brotherton, was published in 2008.
His wife, Donna, died in 1994. Along with his two daughters, he is survived by four grandchildren.

May he rest in Peace. Thank you for your service.

Thursday, February 9, 2012

Padre por poco se mata para entretener a sus hijos...

A la verdad que el tipo es bruto.

un audaz chino, para agradar a sus hijos no encuentra nada mejor que colocar un petardo en la alcantarilla donde esta lleno de gases toxicos..... fuego + gases = combustion